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New York Partnership Plan - Amendment to serve Incarcerated Individuals

DateResponseResponse
Nov 4th 2016 12:37 pm Response: #225777 does this apply for transition age young adults-16-18 years of age. now I understand that the adult age in new York state that can prosecuted is 16. the problem with this age is that they are still like a kid developmentally and socially. I also understand the social determinants of mental health is playing a large role in their life whether they like it or not. second question: can their be a discharge planning specifically designed for TAY in corrections/ that can be included with the Medicaid design to support the discharge of this age group. third question: can this be something that OMH and DOCS can do together as a collaboration for those transition age youth/young adult population in docs that is 6 months away from discharge
Nov 7th 2016 6:20 am Response: #225785 We at Prisoners Are People Too, Inc. have been pushing for humane and professional treatment for our incarcerated citizens for the last eleven years. This amendment ties in perfectly with what we hope to see, as government moves forward to treat our incarcerated loved ones correctly. We want them to be assets to society. This partnership plan will help them to be productive.
Nov 7th 2016 12:17 pm Response: #225789 Communities Together for Health Equity is strongly seeking an amendment to implement the Innovation Funding Proposal below it is the only way Community Based Organizations will have routine funding to implement important projects that contribute to the goals of DSRIP. Even with incarceration the innovation fund will contribute to important Community Based Services for the
re-entry population.

Communities Together for Health Equity presented this Proposal at the last CMS Public Advocate and Managed care meeting. A copy was sent to the New York State Department of Health Medicaid Director who has not responded.
Nov 8th 2016 1:22 pm Response: #225797 b
Nov 8th 2016 4:20 pm Response: #225801 It is essential to establish links to health care services for inmates around the time of release. Given the prevalence of mental illness among inmates, behavioral health care plays a critical role in helping them to access physical health services and put together a life on the outside. It is difficult enough to navigate the Medicaid care system when you are only mildly ill and are established in the community. Inmates with multiple conditions fall through the cracks too often, with many ending up in the hospital unnecessarily.
Nov 9th 2016 10:00 am Response: #225805 Dear Mr. Fishman:
To the terms of New York State’s Medicaid Section 1115 Demonstration Partnership Plan (11-W-00114/2), the State is required to seek Federal approval of any amendments. In accordance with this requirement New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) is submitting this request to the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to amend the 1115 Waiver, seeking the following changes: NYSDOH is requesting an authorization of federal Medicaid matching funds for limited and targeted Medicaid services to be provided in the 30-day period immediately prior to release to incarcerated individuals who are eligible for and enrolled in Medicaid, and are eligible for New York’s Health Home program (i.e., they have two or more chronic physical/behavioral conditions, serious mental illness (SMI) or HIV/AIDS). The goals are to establish linkages to health care prior to release to help ensure individuals can remain healthy and stable in the community. The Amendment will also facilitate the goals of Delivery System Reform Incentive Payment (DSRIP) program to reduce avoidable hospitalizations and health care costs, as well as improve health outcomes.

Communities Together for Health Equity is strongly seeking an amendment to implement the Innovation Funding Proposal it is the only way Community Based Organizations will have routine funding to implement important projects that contribute to the goals of DSRIP. Even with incarceration the innovation fund will contribute to important Community Based Services for the re-entry population.

The DSRIP Innovation Fund provides a groundbreaking means for local community groups to bring their best ideas, best practices, and deep experience to meeting the overall DSRIP goals by joining with their local PPS’s to implement community projects that have enormous potential for improving well-being and reducing hospital and emergency room use. At this time, the state proscribed DSRIP projects allow little practical potential for community groups to participate; nor did the “top down” planning of DSRIP allow local communities to bring forward their best ideas and practices.

Communities Together for Health Equity presented this Proposal at the last CMS Public Advocate and Managed care meeting. A copy was sent to the New York State Department of Health Medicaid Director who has not responded.
Nov 9th 2016 10:18 am Response: #225809 Dear Mr. Fishman,
This Innovation Fund will assure that community potential and experience becomes the integral part of DSRIP they must to
achieve the over-riding goal of health system transformation.The DSRIP Innovation Fund specifically gives funding through every PPS to implement projects proposed and undertaken by local community groups as an integral component of each PPS’s focus and strategy.
The Innovation Projects can both use local assets as well as address the “social determinants” of health in a way that has been largely impossible so far---despite the recognized need for community-based services that are accessible, trusted and that strategically recognize community needs while, to the largest degree possible, involve local residents as “assets” to carry out projects.
There are endless examples of evidence-based strategies and projects that communities could implement with the Innovation Funding I named a few below:
• The many well-proven approaches to mentoring, from mentoring high-risk re-entry populations to mentoring for kids whose high ACE scores underlie their hospital overutilization for both mental and physical conditions
• Peer workers for mental health and substance abuse programs; new approaches to distressed/depressed populations, such as teaching meditation and yoga; cooking classes, walking clubs and other wellness activities dispersed accessibly throughout the community and run by community members.

I would like to support this Innovation Funding proposal and I would like to strongly encourage CMS, and the State to support it as well.

Thank You,
Daphanie Serriano
Nov 10th 2016 8:27 am Response: #225817 NYSDOH is requesting an authorization of federal Medicaid matching funds for limited and targeted Medicaid services to be provided in the 30-day period immediately prior to release to incarcerated individuals who are eligible for and enrolled in Medicaid, and are eligible for New York’s Health Home program (i.e., they have two or more chronic physical/behavioral conditions, serious mental illness (SMI) or HIV/AIDS). - I support this request.
Nov 10th 2016 8:49 am Response: #225821 I worked on discharging planning in a county jail for nearly 7 years. The Office of Mental Health was able to provide medication grants for psychiatric medications (60 days worth), and prescriptions would be called in. For everything else they were given a few days' supply and told to go to their primary care. How is that a priority when they might not have a place to live? The previous medical director would write prescriptions for all diabetic testing supplies and insulin for at least a month. The last time I asked for this the health services administrator told me the inmate has to go to his PCP upon release. She said the jail is only the PCP while in custody. She said, "He probably has everything he needs at home". There's no guarantee of a home after months in jail. Additionally, without health insurance we are almost guaranteed they will not go to their doctor in a timely manner. We don't release people from a hospital that has been providing care with no prescriptions. I know the bottom line is cost. These people end up in emergency rooms possibly resulting in lengthy hospital stays. On top of cost please consider the humanity and basic decency.
Nov 10th 2016 11:25 am Response: #225837 Communities Together for Health Equity (CTHE), a coalition of community-based organizations (CBOs), strongly seeks an amendment to implement the DSRIP Innovation Fund. The Innovation Fund provides the financial means for local community groups to bring their best practices and deep experience to help meet the overall DSRIP goals.

The Innovation Fund sets aside 5% of annual funding for CBOs to join with their local PPSs to implement community projects that have enormous potential to improve the well-being and reduce hospital use. At this time, the state proscribed DSRIP projects allow little practical potential for community groups to participate; nor did the “top down” planning of DSRIP allow local communities to bring forward their best ideas and practices.

There are many examples of evidence-based strategies and projects that communities could implement with the Innovation Fund support. Some examples: extra food provided to reduce end-of-month diabetes-related emergencies when food stamps run out, peer educator-delivered chronic disease self-care education, tailored local mentoring to reduce clinical utilization by youth with behavioral challenges, doulas to provide maternal mental health services. These are just a few of the many possibilities.

If we truly hope to achieve DSRIP’s goals, let us do so by allowing these and other much needed, evidence-based, community programs to be DSRIP-funded.

Specifically, the DSRIP Innovation Fund calls for 5% percent of PPS allocations through years 3 to 5 to be set aside. PPSs and community partners would work together to review local needs and conditions and select projects to receive Innovation Fund grants. The Innovation Fund will follow some of the guidelines set out by the state (in its RFP for a CBO Strategic Planning Consortium): reserved for community groups with annual budgets of $5 million or less and groups that do not provide clinical services or have clinical licenses. However, it should include CBOs that are Health Home members, that bill Medicaid for other than clinical/licensed services.

This fund represents a crucial step towards connecting the services patients receive in the hospitals with the support they need outside, starts to address the many social determinants of health that everyone has agreed DSRIP must confront.

We hope you will stand with CTHE to support the DSRIP Innovation Fund as the vital step for communities to bring their best to DSRIP.
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